Congratulations to Yuot A. Alaak, Kelly Canby, Jon Doust, Madelaine Dickie, Donna Mazza, Helen Milroy and Meg McKinlay, who are all one step closer to winning a Western Australian Premier’s Prize or Fellowship worth $15,000 and $60,000 respectively.

Hassan Al Nawwab was born in Iraq in 1960 and came to Australia in 2003 with his wife and children. He is a poet and journalist who has published three volumes of poetry and two plays in Arabic, and has received numerous awards for his poems.

Last year was a great year for Helen Milroy. Her work was shortlisted for the WA Premier’s Book Awards, the Readings Children’s Book Prize and the Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year Awards, while reviewers called her picture book Backyard Birds vibrant, bright, beautiful, wonderful, colourful and bold. In 2021 the First Nations author […]

Father of the Lost Boys author and former child soldier Yuot A. Alaak says lived experiences have a lot to teach us. He says giving students the opportunity to enter the lives of refugee children in a war, but from a safe distance, can help build empathy and understanding. In this very special blog post, […]

Helen Milroy, and her friend Honey the brush tail possum, have a special message for everyone spending extra time at home this week. They say that the best way to enjoy your time is to read some books about native Australian animals.

Pages from Sally Morgan and Ezekiel Kwaymullina’s vibrant picture book We All Sleep have been chosen to be displayed as part of a new walking trail in the City of Hume, Victoria.

Helen Milroy isn’t your average children’s author. Not only was she the first Aboriginal person in Australia to become a doctor, she’s also an illustrator, psychiatrist and university professor.

Meet Me at the Intersection will be launched at the Wheeler Centre on Tuesday 11 September. Edited by Ambelin Kwaymullina and Rebecca Lim, the book is an anthology of young adult writing that brings together a diverse range of short fiction, memoir and poetry by authors who are First Nations, People of Colour, LGBTIQA+ or […]

Meet Me at the Intersection contributor Rafeif Ismail is a Perth-based, emerging Muslim writer who is a refugee from Sudan identifying as queer. She will be on a panel focusing on diversity at the Great Big Book Club Tea Party, an event co-hosted by the City of Melville and Fremantle Press at AH Bracks Library […]

As Fremantle Press gets ready to publish YA anthology Meet Me at the Intersection, one of the book’s editors, Rebecca Lim, offers six tips for how to reflect diversity in class materials and discussions.

Cheryl Kickett-Tucker is no ordinary children’s author. Once a community newspaper sports journalist, now a research scientist, associate professor and, most importantly, a writer of children’s fiction, Cheryl’s stories appear in Bush and Beyond, a collection of Indigenous stories with tales from Tjalaminu Mia, Jessica Lister and Jaylon Tucker.

Sister Heart by Sally Morgan has been shortlisted for a 2018 Adelaide Festival Award for Literature in the children’s category.

Swimming on the Lawn by Yasmin Hamid follows the adventures of Farida, who lives with her family in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. Sudanese culture and customs are brought to life, from the ubiquitous tea service and hearty breakfasts to the commemoration of Muslim holidays and the rites of birth and death.

I Love Me by Sally Morgan and Ambelin Kwaymullina is longlisted for the Australian Book Industry’s award for Small Publisher’s Children’s Book of the Year.

Representation matters, including in picture book illustrations. Perhaps especially in illustrations, because children are fluent in the language of art in a way that most adults are not. There is no aspect of an illustration that escapes the attention of a child, and this means that to create art for children is to speak to an audience more attuned to the nuances of representation than yourself. This is one of the reasons why the misrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in illustration – or the misrepresentation of other diverse peoples, for that matter – should never be dismissed as being ‘only a picture book’.

Artist and author Sally Morgan shares her highlights from the inaugural Spinifex Story Writing Camp. I spent the last week of June participating in workshops at Tjuntjuntjara Remote School with three amazing people – Karen and Tina from the Indigenous Literacy Foundation (ILF) and illustrator Ann James.

Caterpillar and Butterfly is an Indigenous picture book with vibrant colour and delightfully alliterative text. Read the story in class. Using the colouring-in sheet, encourage students to create their very own colourful butterflies.

Cheryl Kickett-Tucker’s slightly spooky children’s book Barlay! has an important message for young kids.

Sally Morgan edited the Waarda series and created the books’ distinctive front covers. Now she has written her own book for the series called The Magic Fair .

Where did the inspiration for your story come from? My inspiration for Beach Sports Car came from two sources – my childhood memories of Useless Loop and the inventiveness of my father.

Where did the inspiration for Shadow come from? Pat: We thought, if you were a young child who had moved towns and were lonely, wouldn’t it be good to have a secret creature to keep you company and protect you? Shadow is a friendly protective creature who loves Lilli and her mother and nanna. He […]