Wednesday 5 June marks World Environment Day, which is a celebration of all built and natural environments across the planet. With an increasing focus on climate change, plastic use and sustainability, this is the perfect chance to open discussion on these topics in your classroom.

NAIDOC Week takes place in the first week of July each year, which this year is Sunday 7 to Sunday 14 July 2019, and recognises the culture, history and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It’s a great opportunity to show support for your local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Teach Australia’s colonial history through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy embroiled in one of the greatest criminal underworlds in the Gold Rush era. Or start a discussion around grief and loss in young people with a beautifully written literary novel.

From teaching notes to activity sheets, sample chapters to bookmarks, the Fremantle Press Classroom Express has a whole range of resources ready to help you make the most of our books in the classroom.

Fremantle Press author Jon Doust has already seen huge success with his novel Boy on a Wire, which garnered a longlisting for the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Now he’s bringing this tale of bullying, mental health and coming of age to a different audience with a new YA edition of the book.

Is plot really the uncool cousin no-one wants to associate with? Should aspiring writers abstain from sex in favour of taking a large dictionary to bed? And how do you transform the experience of grief into the positive act of creation? As host of the 2019 Fremantle Press podcast series, Holden Sheppard gets to grips […]

Meet Me at the Intersection contributor Olivia Muscat was 13 when she began to lose her sight. Here she talks about how the Harry Potter series defined a pivotal moment in her life, coming to terms with being different and ways in which teachers can work with difference and disability in the classroom.

Meet Me at the Intersection will be launched at the Wheeler Centre on Tuesday 11 September. Edited by Ambelin Kwaymullina and Rebecca Lim, the book is an anthology of young adult writing that brings together a diverse range of short fiction, memoir and poetry by authors who are First Nations, People of Colour, LGBTIQA+ or […]

Reading has a reputation for being a solitary pursuit, but it’s also a great conversation starter and book clubs are a fun way to socialise and connect with like-minded people. This International Youth Day, we’re challenging the youth of Australia to start their own YA book clubs, gather some friends or make some new ones […]

Meet Me at the Intersection contributor Rafeif Ismail is a Perth-based, emerging Muslim writer who is a refugee from Sudan identifying as queer. She will be on a panel focusing on diversity at the Great Big Book Club Tea Party, an event co-hosted by the City of Melville and Fremantle Press at AH Bracks Library […]

Fremantle Press author Deb Fitzpatrick is a familiar face at many schools and writing workshops in and around Perth.

This term’s freebies are a colourful bunch, with bookmarks, teaching notes and activity sheets available for our new August title for middle readers, Off the Track by Cristy Burne and our upcoming YA anthology Meet Me at the Intersection edited by Rebecca Lim and Ambelin Kwaymullina.

As Fremantle Press gets ready to publish YA anthology Meet Me at the Intersection, one of the book’s editors, Rebecca Lim, offers six tips for how to reflect diversity in class materials and discussions.

As NAIDOC Week approaches, take advantage of our wide range of Indigenous titles for children and young adults to join in the community celebrations. Some Indigenous authors are still available for school and community events and can be booked using this author booking form.

Sister Heart by Sally Morgan has been shortlisted for a 2018 Adelaide Festival Award for Literature in the children’s category.

‘You can change anything at all. It is foolish to think there is no light on the horizon.’ Drawn Onward by Meg McKinlay and Andrew Frazer uses a combination of language and typography to demonstrate how to move thoughts from the negative to the positive.

Western Australian novelist Kate McCaffrey has collected the Australian Family Therapists’ Award for Children’s Literature for a third time. Her YA novel Saving Jazz won the $1500 Older Readers Award and a place on the list of titles recommended for use by family therapists.

Class sets of bookmarks and activities for all our latest titles are available now, just in time for Book Week. There’s plenty to do and explore, so make sure to get your order in while stocks last.

Sally Morgan’s Sister Heart was one of 30 books by Australian authors shortlisted for a 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Award this week. Selected from 425 entries, Morgan wins $5,000 for being shortlisted and goes into the running to win $80,000.

Kate McCaffrey’s Destroying Avalon was Australia’s first novel to depict the effects of cyberbullying. A decade on, Kate explains why she’s returned to similar territory in her forthcoming book Saving Jazz.

Kate McCaffrey has won her second Australian Family Therapists’ Award for Children’s Literature for her latest novel, Crashing Down.

What difference does it make if the characters in young adult novels swear? From time to time, publishers are contacted by parents or schools who are concerned by the appearance in YA fiction of (to quote an editor of T. S. Eliot) words ending in ‘uck’ or ‘ugger’.

Artist and author Sally Morgan shares her highlights from the inaugural Spinifex Story Writing Camp. I spent the last week of June participating in workshops at Tjuntjuntjara Remote School with three amazing people – Karen and Tina from the Indigenous Literacy Foundation (ILF) and illustrator Ann James.

Alice Nelson is a novelist who won the T.A.G. Hungerford Award and was named Sydney Morning Herald Best Young Australian Novelist in 2009. Here she talks about her latest book After This: Survivors of the Holocaust speak.